Why I blog, though few will read

It’s time to write again about why I bother keeping a blog. I can’t speak for others, only for myself. What got me started this early morning was looking at a recent blog I subscribe to, and that’s very few. The writer says she’s moved from WordPress to her own domain, WordPress no longer giving her the expansive options she needs. She doesn’t, however, specify, … Continue reading Why I blog, though few will read

Traits we should all want

I saw a recent piece in the Huffington Post, called “7 Habits of Natural Leaders,” and found it riveting. You don’t necessarily have to be in a leadership position, however, to benefit from making these attributes staples of your everyday life. I’ll list them and give my own take on each of the attributes: 1.  They dare to fail: I was a prof for nearly … Continue reading Traits we should all want

Poetry is Truth in Sunday Clothes

We live busy lives and often it seems difficult to take time out, catch our breath, and maybe just reassess whether what we’re chasing is worth our time and worry. In a frenetic world, we probably all have a favorite way of finding sanctuary–perhaps taking time off, or traveling to some idyllic spot, or just off to a meal out or a movie with sweetheart … Continue reading Poetry is Truth in Sunday Clothes

Reminiscence: And I could wish it were 1949 again

The other day, I had a solicitation in the mail from a magazine called Reminiscence. Apparently, a lot of folks like to engage in nostalgia. I confess I occasionally do the same, though I’m aware of how time can soften the contours of the past. Still, I like to muse on past events that were really quite wonderful and that I wish I could relive … Continue reading Reminiscence: And I could wish it were 1949 again

Technology and the shrinking of community

I just read Frank Somerville’s recent post (July 3) on Facebook. For the record, he’s the nightly news anchor on KTVU in Oakland, CA. I don’t live anywhere near the West Coast, so I don’t get to watch him, but Somerville keeps a page on Facebook that I read daily for its keen insights, sensitivity, and passion for social justice. Thank goodness he’s out there … Continue reading Technology and the shrinking of community

Christina Rossetti’s “After Death”: Her unction to the living

  I have always liked the poetry of Christina Rossetti, Victorian England’s foremost female poet. Poetry ran in her genes. Her maternal grandfather had been a poet and translator; and, of course, so was her more famous brother, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, who also excelled at art. I like to think of her in conjunction with the American poet, Emily Dickinson, our most prominent woman poet; … Continue reading Christina Rossetti’s “After Death”: Her unction to the living

Susan Sarandon Gets It: Authentic Living

“I can’t eat. I can’t sleep. I’ve been dreaming of my parents every day,” says Wang Zheng, a 31-year old engineer whose parents were aboard missing Malaysia Airlines Flight  370, now into its third week with still no positive yields as to its fate.  Ironically, new reports of possible debris 1500 miles off the coast of Western Australia aren’t offering the languishing families and friends … Continue reading Susan Sarandon Gets It: Authentic Living

The Yacht Mentality that Threatens our Economy

 I turned on the TV while eating lunch yesterday to a feature called “Island Paradises,” thinking Hawaii or maybe some Caribbean gem like Dominica or St. Vincent’s.  Instead, it was about one man’s substantial investment, worth $28 million, in a plus 100 foot long yacht, sporting 3 recreational decks with pools, 7 bathrooms and 15 bedrooms, plus 3 bars and a below deck garage replete … Continue reading The Yacht Mentality that Threatens our Economy