You Aren’t Who You Think You Are!

Have you ever found yourself so angry, say in an argument, that you’ve yelled, or said mean things, or left the room, or slammed a door, only to feel ashamed later? Have you ever panicked, ready to pull your hair out, because your fear seemed overwhelming, demanding a quick fix that seemed elusive? Perhaps it was in getting bad news such as being fired, or … Continue reading You Aren’t Who You Think You Are!

Winter Discontent: Dickinson’s “There’s a certain Slant of light”

I’m sitting here in our sunroom, looking out this afternoon on our backyard, smothered with frost. We had our first snow cover a week ago, which came early to Kentucky. I’m a warm weather lover, and while those around me complain about heat, I say, more is better. You’d think coming from New England, I’d be more tolerant of snow and ice and lashing wind, … Continue reading Winter Discontent: Dickinson’s “There’s a certain Slant of light”

What myth can teach us about grief

I have always liked myths. Even more so when Jung helped me see their inner life and I learned that, far from being just stories spun by human fantasy, they are windows into the psyche, reflecting all the perambulations of experience that define us such as love and hate, courage and fear, loyalty and betrayal, exploration and boundary. We have this notion of myth, however, … Continue reading What myth can teach us about grief

Jung, Archetypes, and A Parrot: The Legacy of Nature’s Genius

I’ve just finished Joanna Burger’s The Parrot That Owns Me: The Story of a Relationship. Funny, I had this book sitting on my shelf, unread, for twelve years. Looking for something to read while eating my breakfast, I pulled it down and started what turned out to be a fun read. I also learned a great deal about birds and, especially about parrots, surely one … Continue reading Jung, Archetypes, and A Parrot: The Legacy of Nature’s Genius

Internet Ghouls Among Us: The Robin Williams Aftermath

I haven’t any doubt that the vast majority of us mourn the tragic death of Robin Williams, who brought laughter into our hearts and with it, wisdom too. And yet there are always a few, the ghouls  I call them, who surface in such tragedies to verbally vandalize our grief with mindless, and often, acerbic commentary. Recently a bicyclist was killed here in Lexington KY … Continue reading Internet Ghouls Among Us: The Robin Williams Aftermath

A lingering malice that kills

To be happy in life comes down to feeling good about yourself. It isn’t about money, popularity, power, or other commonly assumed indicators of success. In fact, these may actually be forms of over compensation, masking our sense of unworthiness or inferiority. Unfortunately, most of us think we have to earn our self respect by proving ourselves worthy in ways others will approve. Consequently, we … Continue reading A lingering malice that kills

Our Survival at Stake: Do We Have a Future?

As much as we can do it, we should avoid living our lives on assumption that a belief is true simply because we’ve been told it’s so by family, government, religion, politics, economics, or the collective culture in which we’ve been raised.  The only fixed verities are those within the scope of natural law with its defined predictability confirmed by replication.  Our responsibility should be … Continue reading Our Survival at Stake: Do We Have a Future?

Medicine discovers meditation

Funny how the poets I read and taught in college have a way of popping up in my mind, even though I’ve been away from that scene for seven years now.  Take, for instance, the English poet Wordsworth.  He’s famous for his nature poetry and talks about “wise passivity,” by which he meant suspending the thinking part and simply letting the senses imbibe the stillness … Continue reading Medicine discovers meditation